Calendar

Viewing: February 15 — 21

Fri Feb. 15, 2019

  • Deadline to Schedule Final Exams in the TAC-April 4

    12 am
    Testing Accommodations Center (TAC)Please use the TAC website, http://www.disability.illinois.edu/academic-support/accommodations/testing-accommodations, to schedule all exams/quizzes and review polices! Please remember to schedule your exams at least one week in advance online and no later than 8:00am one business day before you schedule to take the exam. The Deadline to schedule Final Exams for the Spring 2019 Semester is April 4, 2019 by 4:00pm.
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • University of Illinois Press Publishing Symposium

    8:30 am – 6 pm

    3rd floor Levis Faculty Center

    Symposium Agenda

    *We encourage you to join us throughout the day as your schedule permits!*

    8:30 to 9:00Coffee/tea and conversation9:00 to 9:15Welcome

    Laurie Matheson, Director, University of Illinois Press

    Cynthia Oliver, Department of Dance and Associate Vice Chancellor - Humanities, Arts, and Related Fields

    9:15 to 10:30One-on-One Proposal Meetings with Editors

    University of Illinois Press Acquisitions Editors: Dawn Durante, Danny Nasset, Marika Christofides, and James Engelhardt

    AND

    Behind the Curtain: Demystifying Scholarly Publishing
    Presenter: Laurie Matheson

    We open our inaugural publishing symposium with a "soup to nuts" overview of scholarly publishing. The session will include plentiful tips on preparing a proposal, approaching an editor, and navigating the peer review and revision process; advice on revising a dissertation; and insights on the current, rapidly evolving publishing landscape.

    10:45 to 12:00New Directions in Journal Publication

    Compared with books, journal publication offers more direct access to core readerships, shorter production times, a breadth of peer review practices, integrated multimedia features, and other benefits—as well as a chance to broaden a scholar's publishing purview or stake an early claim on an area of pioneering research. This panel brings together experienced journal editors from UI Press and faculty for a discussion of best practices and innovations in this flexible, forward looking domain.

    Moderator: Gayle Magee, School of Music

    Laura Hetrick, Department of Art Education and co-editor of Visual Arts Research

    Amy Ando, Department of Agricultural & Consumer Economics

    Carol Symes, Department of History and founding editor of The Medieval Globe

    S. Lance Cooper, Department of Physics

    Jeff McArdle, Associate Journals Manager, University of Illinois Press

    12:00 to 1:00Lunch and Learn: Debunking Publishing Myths

    Facilitator: Rebecca Ferrell, Director of Public Relations and Engagement for the Department of Dance

    In a campy, comfy, lunch-eating, fun session, Rebecca Ferrell entertains and dispenses with the myths of publishing. Strike down your fears, and get the nitty gritty—on the real! There will be costumes, knowing sages, and who knows what else??? Bring your appetite and your sense of humor.

    * Box lunches will be provided to those who pre-register by February 7.

    Facilitator: Rebecca Ferrell, Director of Public Relations and Engagement for the Department of Dance

    1:00 to 2:15Professional Development Roundtable: Tips for the First Book, Establishing Authority in a Field, and Navigating the Tenure Track

    In this roundtable, panelists will share their experiences with publishing and navigating academia. They will discuss revising a dissertation and publishing a first book; establishing authority in a field through conferencing, journals, popular press/social media, etc.; and other professionalization issues like work-life balance, pursuing tenure, and publishing after the first book.

    Moderator: Dawn Durante, Senior Acquisitions Editor

    Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert, Department of History and Director of American Indian Studies

    Ruth Nicole Brown, Department of Gender and Women's Studies

    Nicole Cooke, iSchool

    2:30 to 3:45Building a Relationship with a University Press

    Join us for a panel discussion about building a relationship with a university press. Panelists will present on and answer questions about different aspects of the publishing process including editing, design, production, and marketing

    Jennifer Comeau, Assistant Director and EDP Manager

    Heather Gernenz, Publicity Manager

    Dustin Hubbart, Art Director

    Michael Roux, Director of Marketing

    4:00 to 5:00Keynote Address: #PublishingWhileBlack: Reflections on "Diversity," Antiracism, and Equity

    Speaker: Jill Petty, Former Editor for South End Press, Beacon Press, and Northwestern University Press

    In this wide-ranging yet personal talk, editor, activist, and educator Jill Petty will reflect on her 15 + year career in social justice publishing, and share assessments of efforts to "diversify" publishing and other knowledge production industries. Petty will touch on her recent move away from traditional/corporate book publishing, and explore her engagements with explicitly radical houses; the former South End Press editor/publisher now consults for Haymarket Books. She will also discuss her new communications post with the Kellogg Foundation, a philanthropic organization that centers racial equity and community health.

    5:00 to 6:00Continuing the Conversation

    We invite you to stay after the keynote for an opportunity to continue the conversations generated throughout the day!

  • SWC [Python]

    Multi-Day
    What basic computing skills do I need as a researcher? How do I maintain my research code? How can I quickly and automatically process my experimental data? This two-day workshop will cover the skills you need to succeed as all fields become data-driven:Scriptingfor task and data managementProgrammingwith thePythonscripting languageDataManagement andVersion controlwith Gitand more . . .This two-day workshop is an example-driven tutorial on basic computing skills, hosted byComputational Science and Engineeringat the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Short tutorials alternate with hands-on practical exercises, and participants are encouraged both to help one another, and to try applying what they have learned to their own research problems during and between sessions. Participants should bring their own laptops to work on. Everyone is welcome, and this will be especially useful to graduate students, postdocs, and researchers who have not begun to leverage the power of scripting and version control for reproducible research. We especially encourage members of a course or research group to sign up together to reinforce good habits. Ask your advisor (if you are a research assistant) about development funds from research grants.
  • Software Carpentry Workshop [Python]

    Multi-Day

    1040 NCSA

    What basic computing skills do I need as a researcher?

    How do I maintain my research code?

    How can I quickly and automatically process my experimental data?

    This two-day workshop will cover the skills you need to succeed as all fields become data-driven:

    • Scripting for task and data management
    • Programming with the Python scripting language
    • Data Management and Version control with Git
    • and more . . .

    This two-day workshop is an example-driven tutorial on basic computing skills, hosted by Computational Science and Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.  Short tutorials alternate with hands-on practical exercises, and participants are encouraged both to help one another, and to try applying what they have learned to their own research problems during and between sessions.  Participants should bring their own laptops to work on.

    Everyone is welcome, and this will be especially useful to graduate students, postdocs, and researchers who have not begun to leverage the power of scripting and version control for reproducible research.  We especially encourage members of a course or research group to sign up together to reinforce good habits. Ask your advisor (if you are a research assistant) about development funds from research grants.

  • Access 2016: Forms

    9 am – 12 pm
    In this three-hour workshop attendees will learn how to create and work with Access forms. We will create a new form using the form wizard and explore the layout view and the design view. We will learn how to modify the controls in the form as well as add new controls, including a calculated control and lookup control. Next we will learn about control properties, form properties and setting the tab order. We will create a subform (a form within a form) and finish up learning about switchboard and navigation forms. Prerequisite: Completion of Access 2016 Getting Started or equivalent knowledge Hours: 3 hours Offered at NO CHARGE to all University of Illinois (Urbana campus) faculty/staff.
  • Graduate Writing Groups

    9 am – 1 pm
    Want to meet your writing goals in a distraction-free setting? Join the Writers Workshop for sustained writing in the company of your colleagues from across the disciplines. Each session begins with a short conversation about goals and ends with a wrap-up of accomplishments.
  • Access 2016: Forms

    9 am – 12 pm
    In this three-hour workshop attendees will learn how to create and work with Access forms. We will create a new form using the form wizard and explore the layout view and the design view. We will learn how to modify the controls in the form as well as add new controls, including a calculated control and lookup control. Next we will learn about control properties, form properties and setting the tab order. We will create a subform (a form within a form) and finish up learning about switchboard and navigation forms. Prerequisite: Completion of Access 2016 Getting Started or equivalent knowledge Hours: 3 hours Offered at NO CHARGE to all University of Illinois (Urbana campus) faculty/staff.
  • Intro to Linux and Biocluster (Part - 2)

    9 am – 12:30 pm

    IGB 607

    Hosted & taught by High-Performance Biological Computing (HPCBio) with the support of the OVCR. CNRG (Computer Network Resource Group) instructs Biocluster session. 

  • Access 2016: Forms

    9 am – 12 pm
    In this three-hour workshop attendees will learn how to create and work with Access forms. We will create a new form using the form wizard and explore the layout view and the design view. We will learn how to modify the controls in the form as well as add new controls, including a calculated control and lookup control. Next we will learn about control properties, form properties and setting the tab order. We will create a subform (a form within a form) and finish up learning about switchboard and navigation forms. Prerequisite: Completion of Access 2016 Getting Started or equivalent knowledge Hours: 3 hours Offered at NO CHARGE to all University of Illinois (Urbana campus) faculty/staff.
  • AI Symposium

    10 am – 3 pm
    Join the Gies College of Business, NCSA and Synchrony for the AI Symposium on February 15 from 10am-3pm at NCSA. This free event is open to students, faculty and staff, and will include interactive displays and sessions from top companies in AI such as Google, John Deere, Synchrony and more. Students may register at: go.illinois.edu/RegisterAI. Additional information can be found at: https://business.illinois.edu/mstm/ai-symposium/.Agenda10:00 am Welcome and Overview of Symposium Robert Brunner, Associate Dean of Innovation & Chief Disruption Officer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Gies College of Business 10:15 am AI at NCSA Scott Wilkin, Deputy Director, National Center for Super Computing Applications 10:30 am Hardware + Software + AI: AI in Google's Pixel 3 Christopher Baker, Product Manager, Google Pixel 3, Google's latest Pixel Phone, pushes the boundaries of what's possible with a smartphone leveraging tight hardware + software + AI integration. This talk will outline how AI fits into the Pixel 3, enables features, and creates value for users. 11:00 am Crop Detection through Deep Learning Brandon Dohman, Digital Delivery Lead North America, Syngenta We have built a Deep Learning model based on a neural network architecture that was previously used for Biomedical Image Segmentation. 11:30 am AI at the Edge Mark Moran, Director, John Deere Technology Innovation Center After 50 years of Moore's law, significant computational power is now becoming available at the edge. For the last ten years, the transformation in AI has been defined by connecting to the Cloud. Over the next decade, a shift of AI to the edge may prove to be more disruptive by creating new architectures for sensing, deciding, and acting. 12:00 pm Networking and Interactive Displays 1:15 pm Accelerating Material Discovery using AI, Robotics and Material Science Brian Stankiewicz, Research Scientist, 3M AI has matured to a place where the value now is applying known techniques to real-world problems. One emerging field is Materials Informatics which combines Materials Science, AI and robotics to accelerate materials discovery. 1:45 pm Fireside Chat: The Intersection of AI and Business Decision-making Amy Walter, Executive Leader Digital Technology & Strategic Transformation, Synchrony Theresa Kraus, SVP Network Strategy & Process Optimization, Synchrony Moderator: Robert Brunner, Associate Dean of Innovation & Chief Disruption Officer, University of Illinois Gies College of Business A fireside chat with two senior leaders from Synchrony, the largest private credit card provider in the U.S. They will discuss how technology and business need to work closely together to leverage AI and drive value for the firm. 2:45 pm Concluding Remarks
  • Managing Your Citations with Mendeley

    12 pm – 1 pm
    Are you overwhelmed by organizing your sources? Mendeley is a free citation manager that helps you store and organize your files and insert formatted citations into papers. You will leave this hands-on workshop with a Mendeley library set up and ready to use! http://guides.library.illinois.edu/mendeley
  • Driving physical mechanisms of three fluid-structure interaction problems involving flexible flat plate

    12 pm
    Abstract Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is ubiquitous in the natural and engineered world, and a better understanding of FSI systems can aid in the design of renewable energy harvesting technologies, bio-inspired propulsion vehicles, and biomedical devices (to name a few). Towards that end, in this talk we will investigate three FSI problems involving a flexible flat plate; the first two of these are relevant for renewable energy harvesting based on flow-induced vibrations and the final problem is pertinent to bio-inspired propulsion. In the first of the three systems, we will ask what physical mechanisms drive chaotic flag flapping. As part of this, the extension of standard data-driven decompositions such as proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition to FSI systems will be discussed. The second FSI problem we will consider is "inverted" flag flapping,in which the flag is clamped at its trailing edge with respect to the incoming uniform flow.The physical mechanism responsible for the onset of flapping, the role of vortex shedding in flapping, and the chaotic flapping regime that the system undergoes for a range of parameters will all be discussed. Finally, we will probe the role of flexibility in propulsive performance. Our focus here will be on whether resonance plays a role in performance at finite amplitudes, and to get at the heart of this question we will use eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the fully-coupled FSI system to appropriately define resonance. Bio Andres Goza is an Assistant Professor in the Aerospace Engineering Department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his PhD from Caltech in 2017 and was a postdoctoralresearcher at Princeton University from 2017-2018. His research focuses on the use of computational fluid dynamics and modeling techniques to gain fundamental physical insights into fluid-structure interaction (FSI) systems. Andres's interest in these systems ranges from understanding flow-induced vibrations towards more robust energy harvesting strategies to investigating the use of FSI devices for passively controlling and/or estimating the flow state in unsteady aerodynamic settings. He was awarded an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to perform his doctoral work, and his thesis work led to his selection as a Caltech Everhart Lecturer. He was also selected for an Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award at Caltech in 2015.

Sat Feb. 16, 2019

  • Free as a Bird: Bird Inspired structures to improve agility in engineered unmanned aerial vehicles

    10:15 am
    Abstract For thousands of years, bird flight have inspired and challenged our imaginations and dreams. Man has aspired to build machines to help him fly like birds. Even today, there are still significant efforts unerway focused on understanding the physics of avian flight. There is an increasing need for small aerial robots to conduct a variety of civilian and military mission scenarios. This talk starts by showing that avian-inspired flight has the potential to combine the desired capabilities of hovering, maneurverability, agility, safety, and stealth. The concept of wings as multifunctional adaptive structures will be discussed and several flight devices found on birds' wings will be introduced as a pathway towards revolutionizing the current design of small unmanned air vehicles.

Mon Feb. 18, 2019

  • Deadline to Schedule Final Exams in the TAC-April 4

    12 am
    Testing Accommodations Center (TAC)Please use the TAC website, http://www.disability.illinois.edu/academic-support/accommodations/testing-accommodations, to schedule all exams/quizzes and review polices! Please remember to schedule your exams at least one week in advance online and no later than 8:00am one business day before you schedule to take the exam. The Deadline to schedule Final Exams for the Spring 2019 Semester is April 4, 2019 by 4:00pm.
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • Understanding Impact: Impact Factor and Other Research Metrics

    10 am – 11 am
    You're writing your first article and you aren't sure which journals to submit it to, or you are in a tenure-track position and you'll need to include an author-level metric in your dossier. In this workshop, we will learn how to distinguish between numerous bibliometrics, including impact factor, h-index, and altmetrics and we'll get hands-on practice using some of the research metric tools. http://guides.library.illinois.edu/impact
  • Thesis Office Hours

    2 pm – 4 pm
    Do you have a question about formatting your thesis? Would you like someone to review the content and format of your title page? Do you just want to talk to someone about your thesis? We would love to help! Feel free to stop by our office hours at any time! See the full listing of Graduate College workshops:go.grad.illinois.edu/workshops
  • Thesis Office Hours

    2 pm – 4 pm
    Do you have a question about formatting your thesis? Would you like someone to review the content and format of your title page? Do you just want to talk to someone about your thesis? We would love to help! Feel free to stop by our office hours at any time! See the full listing of Graduate College workshops:go.grad.illinois.edu/workshops
  • Thesis Office Hours

    2 pm – 4 pm
    Do you have a question about formatting your thesis? Would you like someone to review the content and format of your title page? Do you just want to talk to someone about your thesis? We would love to help! Feel free to stop by our office hours at any time! See the full listing of Graduate College workshops:go.grad.illinois.edu/workshops
  • Thesis Office Hours

    2 pm – 4 pm
    Do you have a question about formatting your thesis? Would you like someone to review the content and format of your title page? Do you just want to talk to someone about your thesis? We would love to help! Feel free to stop by our office hours at any time!
  • Theoretical and Computational Biophysics Seminar

    3 pm

    Check the resource site for more information.

  • Curating Your Online Scholarly Identity to Maximize the Reach and Impact of Your Work

    3 pm – 4 pm
    ResearchGate, Google Scholar, ORCID, Mendeley, and SSRN are just some of the online scholarly collaboration networks you might be trying to manage. Many scholars and graduate students are now leveraging some or all of these and other platforms to share their work, thereby increasing the impact and visibility of their scholarship. Learn more about how to effectively use researcher profile systems and scholarly communications networks to develop and manage your online scholarly presence.
  • Establishing the relationships between local micromechanics and material performance using 3D X-ray diffraction

    4 pm
    Abstract: Advanced materials are internationally recognized as a foundation for newcapabilities, tools, and technologies that meet urgent societal needs. "Advanced materials"broadly describes innovative materials that have atypical sizes, microstructures, and responses.These atypical characteristics enable major, previously impossible technological breakthroughs, yet many advanced materials owe their desirable properties to complex underlyingmicromechanics. Establishing the relationships between these local micromechanics and materialperformance is critical to the widespread implementation and evolution of advanced materials.Toward these goals, I utilize modern 3D X-ray diffraction techniques that offer the capability to measure the deformation and microstructure evolution inside bulk materials, in situ, and acrossnine orders of magnitude in length scales (nm to mm). Thus, these techniques can be used tosimultaneously measure local microstructure events and the consequent macroscopic response. Guided by 3D X-ray diffraction experiments, I present several studies showing how materialperformance is dictated by local micromechanics and discuss the design approach of using"critical structure/microstructure features" to control micromechanics in ways that optimizematerial performance. Biography: Ashley Bucsek is a President's Postdoctoral Fellow in the Aerospace Engineeringand Mechanics Department at the University of Minnesota. Her research brings together cutting-edgeexperiments and micromechanical theory to accelerate the prediction and manipulation ofdeformation mechanisms in crystalline materials, especially structural and functional materials.She has used and developed synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques for studying advanced materials at the Advanced Photon Source, Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Diffraction Source,and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. She has worked as a visiting scientist at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, is a former Student Board Member on the Board ofASM's International Organization on Shape Memory and Superelastic Technologies, and is therecipient of an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and NSF Graduate Research OpportunitiesWorldwide Award. She received an M.S. and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from ColoradoSchool of Mines.

Tue Feb. 19, 2019

  • Deadline to Schedule Final Exams in the TAC-April 4

    12 am
    Testing Accommodations Center (TAC)Please use the TAC website, http://www.disability.illinois.edu/academic-support/accommodations/testing-accommodations, to schedule all exams/quizzes and review polices! Please remember to schedule your exams at least one week in advance online and no later than 8:00am one business day before you schedule to take the exam. The Deadline to schedule Final Exams for the Spring 2019 Semester is April 4, 2019 by 4:00pm.
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • Excel 2016: Formulas & Functions

    9 am – 11 am
    In this 2-hour short course you will learn how to add, divide, multiply, and subtract by entering formulas into Excel 2016 worksheets. Other topics will include an exploration of just a few of the hundreds of functions available in Excel. We will learn how to find a specific function, as well as how to get help while entering arguments. Finally, we will sample a function or two from some of the more commonly used categories of functions including statistical, logical, financial, and date & time.Prerequisite: Completion of Excel Getting Started, or equivalent knowledge
  • Lightroom: Getting Started

    10 am – 12 pm
    In this 2-hour workshop, participants will learn how to adjust a photo's color and brightness in Lightroom; crop, straighten, and fix perspective, brush over certain parts of a photo for local adjustments; and work with photos on multiple devices. No prior knowledge of Lightroom is required.
  • "Multiscale and Multiphysics Porous Media and Geo-Materials Modeling"

    12 pm
    Abstract: The complex structures and spatial variability of porous media has made its modeling a challenging problem since it requires extensive datasets. This challenge has become a motivation to take advantage of every available data from diverse scales and types to improve the accuracy of mechanical and flow modeling in porous media. Mechanical modeling in porous media is highly influenced by the mineralogy, morphology, multiscale pore networks, thermal variability and fluid flow across many scales. In this presentation: (i) a new stochastic method for integrating data for large-scale subsurface and surface systems will be presented, which addresses the problem of reconstructing complex porous media for accurate modeling of porous media and other large-scale problem, as well as laboratory-scale porous media, (ii) multiphysics coupling impact on irregular granular media will be addressed, (iii) application of the recent machine learning algorithms, for harnessing big data and predicting important variables in porous media, will be briefly discussed as well. The aim of this presentation is to highlight the importance of static and coupled processes in porous modeling and their influences on the overall performance for energy (e.g. geothermal, shale, CO2 sequestration) and environmental related problems. To this end, several examples will also be discussed during this presentation.
  • Profiling Cells Inside and Out with Nanostructured Materials

    12 pm
    "Profiling Cells Inside and Out with Nanostructured Materials" Shana Kelley, PhD University of Toronto, Departments of Chemistry, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Biochemistry, Institute for Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering
  • Curious Eclectic Seminar Series

    12 pm

    Check the resource site for more information.

  • Messy Data? Clean it up with OpenRefine!

    2 pm – 3:30 pm
    Join us for a workshop which introduces OpenRefine, a free, open source tool used to organize, clean up, and transform your data. We will provide an overview of the browser based application, as well as use cases that show the benefits of working with your data in OpenRefine, and demonstrate the basic functions to get you started on cleaning up your data. http://researchdataservice.illinois.edu/ http://openrefine.org/ https://guides.library.illinois.edu/openrefine
  • Biomechanics of the Eye Wall with Applications to Glaucoma

    3 pm
    Abstract The sclera and optic nerve head, along with the cornea, are connective tissues that form the outer wallof the eye in humans. These stiff and tough tissues serve to mechanically support the delicate retinal and neuraltissues of theeye while maintaining an optimal shape for refraction. The mechanical properties of the sclera and optic nerve head tissues arise from the fiber-reinforced microstructure of the extracellular matrix, which iscomposed mainly of collagenand elastin fibers arranged in a proteoglycan-rich matrix. The extracelullar matrix structure in the human optic nerve head is called the lamina cribrosa for its perforated appearance. Variations in the mechanical properties maycontribute to the susceptibility and progression of diseases, such as glaucoma. Mousemodels of glaucoma have been used to study the biomechanical effects of glaucomatousaxondamage. The mousesclera has a similar extracellular matrix structure as in human, but themouse optic nerve head does not have a connectivetissue lamina cribrosa. It containsinstead a network of astrocytes withlong processes organized into structuresthat are evocative of the collagen beam structure of the human laminacribrosa. In this presentation, I will describe our efforts to understand thestructure-properties relationshipof the sclera and optic nerve head tissues of human and mouse eyes using an integrated experimental and computational method. Tomeasure the mechanical behavior of the tissues under physiological conditions, wehave developed ex-vivo inflation tests with optical imaging and 3D digitalimage correlation (3D-DIC) and digital volume correlation. Wealsodeveloped methods to measure the anisotropy ofthefibrouscollagenmicrostructure of the sclera and the beam network microstructure of the lamina tissue of our inflation tested specimens. This has allowed us to develop specimen-specific computationalmicromechanicalmodels to studythe structure-properties relationship of these tissuesandextract their anisotropic nonlinear elastic propertiesusinginverseanalysis. I will alsodescribe applying these methods on experimental mouse models ofglaucoma along with chemical and pharmacological interventions to study the remodeling of the tissues with glaucoma. About the Speaker Thao (Vicky) Nguyen received her S.B. from MIT in 1998, and M.S. and Ph.D. from Stanford in 2004, all inmechanical engineering. She was a research scientist at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore from 2004-2007, before joining the Mechanical Engineering Department at The Johns Hopkins University, where she iscurrently a tenured Associate Professor and The Marlin U. Zimmerman Faculty Scholar in the departments ofMechanical Engineering and Materials Science. Dr.Nguyen's research encompasses the biomechanics of soft tissues and the mechanics of active polymers andbiomaterials. Dr. Nguyen has received the 2008 PresidentialEarly Career Award for Scientists and Engineers(PECASE) and the NNSA Office of Defense Programs Early Career Scientists and Engineer Awards for her work onmodeling the thermomechanical behavior of shapememory polymers. She received the 2013 NSF CAREER awardand 2016 JHU Catalyst Award to study the micromechanisms of growth and remodeling of collagenous tissues. Shewas also awarded the inaugural EshelbyMechanics Award for Young Faculty for the creative developmentand applications of mechanics and the ASME Sia Nemat-Nasser Early Career Award for research excellence inmechanics and materials in 2013, and theT.J.R. Hughes Young Investigator Award from the Applied MechanicsDivision in 2015.
  • Biomechanics of the Eye Wall with Applications to Glaucoma

    3 pm
    Abstract The sclera and optic nerve head, along with the cornea, are connective tissues that form the outer wallof the eye in humans. These stiff and tough tissues serve to mechanically support the delicate retinal and neuraltissues of theeye while maintaining an optimal shape for refraction. The mechanical properties of the sclera and optic nerve head tissues arise from the fiber-reinforced microstructure of the extracellular matrix, which iscomposed mainly of collagenand elastin fibers arranged in a proteoglycan-rich matrix. The extracelullar matrix structure in the human optic nerve head is called the lamina cribrosa for its perforated appearance. Variations in the mechanical properties maycontribute to the susceptibility and progression of diseases, such as glaucoma. Mousemodels of glaucoma have been used to study the biomechanical effects of glaucomatousaxondamage. The mousesclera has a similar extracellular matrix structure as in human, but themouse optic nerve head does not have a connectivetissue lamina cribrosa. It containsinstead a network of astrocytes withlong processes organized into structuresthat are evocative of the collagen beam structure of the human laminacribrosa. In this presentation, I will describe our efforts to understand thestructure-properties relationshipof the sclera and optic nerve head tissues of human and mouse eyes using an integrated experimental and computational method. Tomeasure the mechanical behavior of the tissues under physiological conditions, wehave developed ex-vivo inflation tests with optical imaging and 3D digitalimage correlation (3D-DIC) and digital volume correlation. Wealsodeveloped methods to measure the anisotropy ofthefibrouscollagenmicrostructure of the sclera and the beam network microstructure of the lamina tissue of our inflation tested specimens. This has allowed us to develop specimen-specific computationalmicromechanicalmodels to studythe structure-properties relationship of these tissuesandextract their anisotropic nonlinear elastic propertiesusinginverseanalysis. I will alsodescribe applying these methods on experimental mouse models ofglaucoma along with chemical and pharmacological interventions to study the remodeling of the tissues with glaucoma. About the Speaker Thao (Vicky) Nguyen received her S.B. from MIT in 1998, and M.S. and Ph.D. from Stanford in 2004, all inmechanical engineering. She was a research scientist at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore from 2004-2007, before joining the Mechanical Engineering Department at The Johns Hopkins University, where she iscurrently a tenured Associate Professor and The Marlin U. Zimmerman Faculty Scholar in the departments ofMechanical Engineering and Materials Science. Dr.Nguyen's research encompasses the biomechanics of soft tissues and the mechanics of active polymers andbiomaterials. Dr. Nguyen has received the 2008 PresidentialEarly Career Award for Scientists and Engineers(PECASE) and the NNSA Office of Defense Programs Early Career Scientists and Engineer Awards for her work onmodeling the thermomechanical behavior of shapememory polymers. She received the 2013 NSF CAREER awardand 2016 JHU Catalyst Award to study the micromechanisms of growth and remodeling of collagenous tissues. Shewas also awarded the inaugural EshelbyMechanics Award for Young Faculty for the creative developmentand applications of mechanics and the ASME Sia Nemat-Nasser Early Career Award for research excellence inmechanics and materials in 2013, and theT.J.R. Hughes Young Investigator Award from the Applied MechanicsDivision in 2015.
  • Biomechanics of the Eye Wall with Applications to Glaucoma

    3 pm
    Abstract The sclera and optic nerve head, along with the cornea, are connective tissues that form the outer wallof the eye in humans. These stiff and tough tissues serve to mechanically support the delicate retinal and neuraltissues of theeye while maintaining an optimal shape for refraction. The mechanical properties of the sclera and optic nerve head tissues arise from the fiber-reinforced microstructure of the extracellular matrix, which iscomposed mainly of collagenand elastin fibers arranged in a proteoglycan-rich matrix. The extracelullar matrix structure in the human optic nerve head is called the lamina cribrosa for its perforated appearance. Variations in the mechanical properties maycontribute to the susceptibility and progression of diseases, such as glaucoma. Mousemodels of glaucoma have been used to study the biomechanical effects of glaucomatousaxondamage. The mousesclera has a similar extracellular matrix structure as in human, but themouse optic nerve head does not have a connectivetissue lamina cribrosa. It containsinstead a network of astrocytes withlong processes organized into structuresthat are evocative of the collagen beam structure of the human laminacribrosa. In this presentation, I will describe our efforts to understand thestructure-properties relationshipof the sclera and optic nerve head tissues of human and mouse eyes using an integrated experimental and computational method. Tomeasure the mechanical behavior of the tissues under physiological conditions, wehave developed ex-vivo inflation tests with optical imaging and 3D digitalimage correlation (3D-DIC) and digital volume correlation. Wealsodeveloped methods to measure the anisotropy ofthefibrouscollagenmicrostructure of the sclera and the beam network microstructure of the lamina tissue of our inflation tested specimens. This has allowed us to develop specimen-specific computationalmicromechanicalmodels to studythe structure-properties relationship of these tissuesandextract their anisotropic nonlinear elastic propertiesusinginverseanalysis. I will alsodescribe applying these methods on experimental mouse models ofglaucoma along with chemical and pharmacological interventions to study the remodeling of the tissues with glaucoma. About the Speaker Thao (Vicky) Nguyen received her S.B. from MIT in 1998, and M.S. and Ph.D. from Stanford in 2004, all inmechanical engineering. She was a research scientist at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore from 2004-2007, before joining the Mechanical Engineering Department at The Johns Hopkins University, where she iscurrently a tenured Associate Professor and The Marlin U. Zimmerman Faculty Scholar in the departments ofMechanical Engineering and Materials Science. Dr.Nguyen's research encompasses the biomechanics of soft tissues and the mechanics of active polymers andbiomaterials. Dr. Nguyen has received the 2008 PresidentialEarly Career Award for Scientists and Engineers(PECASE) and the NNSA Office of Defense Programs Early Career Scientists and Engineer Awards for her work onmodeling the thermomechanical behavior of shapememory polymers. She received the 2013 NSF CAREER awardand 2016 JHU Catalyst Award to study the micromechanisms of growth and remodeling of collagenous tissues. Shewas also awarded the inaugural EshelbyMechanics Award for Young Faculty for the creative developmentand applications of mechanics and the ASME Sia Nemat-Nasser Early Career Award for research excellence inmechanics and materials in 2013, and theT.J.R. Hughes Young Investigator Award from the Applied MechanicsDivision in 2015.
  • GradMAP: Planning for Success

    3:30 pm – 5 pm
    What do you want to achieve in grad school? In GradMAP, you will develop a personalized development plan so you can get the most out of your time in grad school and make use of campus resources. In this hands-on program, you will identify goals and make a plan to achieve them by developing advanced skills. GradMAP is open to graduate students at any level, but it is especially useful for students in the first several years of their programs. See the full listing of Graduate College workshops: go.grad.illinois.edu/workshops
  • BRL Seminar and Journal Club

    4 pm

    Check the resource site for more information.

  • Preparing for the Job Search: Cover Letters and Resumes

    4 pm – 5 pm
    This workshop will help you prepare two documents that you'll use frequently during your job search: the cover letter and resume. Learn basic formatting, effective word choice, and tips for tailoring your documents to specific employers
  • 2019 NSP Spring Seminar Series

    4 pm

    Check the resource site for more information.

  • Preparing for the Job Search: Cover Letters and Resumes

    4 pm – 5 pm
    This workshop will help you prepare two documents that you'll use frequently during your job search: the cover letter and resume. Learn basic formatting, effective word choice, and tips for tailoring your documents to specific employers
  • Preparing for the Job Search: Cover Letters and Resumes

    4 pm – 5 pm
    This workshop will help you prepare two documents that you'll use frequently during your job search: the cover letter and resume. Learn basic formatting, effective word choice, and tips for tailoring your documents to specific employers
  • CITL Statistics, Data, and Survey Research Workshop Series - SPSS I: Getting Started with SPSS

    5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
    SPSS is a user-friendly program that allows you to conduct statistical analyses through simple point-and-click menu items. This is an introductory course where you will learn the basic menu options and will be useful for people who have never used SPSS before. Topics covered include:Introduction to data editor and variable view environmentsChanging SPSS optionsComputing new variablesVariable bandingRecoding variablesCreating frequency and contingency tablesObtaining univariate statistics, bar charts, and pie chartsHandling SPSS output
  • EPI Workshop, Session 3: Tuesday, February 19, 5:30 to 6:45pm. Learn strategies for answering open-ended questions.

    5:30 pm – 6:45 pm
    Workshop Series: Preparing to Take the EPI These four workshops are designed for Graduate Students who plan to take the EPI. The workshops are free, but registration is required. Space is limited, so register early at http://go.illinois.edu/EPI_Workshop_Registration. First-time test-takers and students re-taking the EPI are eligible to attend. Each workshop will focus on a different part of the EPI, including the EPI's structure, how it's scored, preparation tips, definition of terms, responding to open-ended questions, strategies for effective interviewing, and activities and resources you can use on your own to prepare for the EPI. During each session, you'll also have time to practice what you've learned and receive brief feedback. Detailed information about the EPI can be found at http://citl.illinois.edu/citl-101/measurement-evaluation/english-proficiency-interview. Questions? Email us at citl-epi-info@illinois.edu. Location: Room 428, Armory Building (Southwest corner of the Armory Building).

Wed Feb. 20, 2019

  • Deadline to Schedule Final Exams in the TAC-April 4

    12 am
    Testing Accommodations Center (TAC)Please use the TAC website, http://www.disability.illinois.edu/academic-support/accommodations/testing-accommodations, to schedule all exams/quizzes and review polices! Please remember to schedule your exams at least one week in advance online and no later than 8:00am one business day before you schedule to take the exam. The Deadline to schedule Final Exams for the Spring 2019 Semester is April 4, 2019 by 4:00pm.
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • The Power of Presentations: Enhancing your Slides for Teaching and Engagement

    11 am – 12 pm
    Throughout your life you will, almost certainly, give presentations. We've all sat through presentations that were boring, confusing, and drab. How do you communicate your message most succinctly? What visuals will captivate and inform our students the best? Is it only about the PowerPoint or are there other techniques that leave a lasting impression on the audience? In this session we distill the magic that just might take your next presentation from bland to grand.http:/go.illinois.edu/presentation Note: This workshop counts towards, the Graduate Teacher Certificate, the Certificate in Foundations of Teaching, or the Certificate in Technology-Enhanced Teaching.
  • Introduction to Text Mining Concepts and Sources

    11 am – 12:30 pm
    This workshop will introduce basic concepts and approaches related to text mining, as well as resources the library has for text mining, including text data sets of academic literature as well as historical and archival resources. We will spend some time in the session introducing a couple of very basic and free text mining tools.
  • The Power of Presentations: Enhancing your Slides for Teaching and Engagement

    11 am – 12 pm
    Throughout your life you will, almost certainly, give presentations. We've all sat through presentations that were boring, confusing, and drab. How do you communicate your message most succinctly? What visuals will captivate and inform your audience the best? Is it only about your slide design or are there other techniques that leave a lasting impression? In this session we distill the magic that just might take your next presentation from bland to grand. http:/go.illinois.edu/presentation
  • Jr. Faculty Spring 2019 Teaching Series, wksp #3: Creating a Promising Syllabus to Motivate Learning

    11:30 am – 1 pm
    Junior Faculty Seminar Series on Teaching & Learning Come join this learning community by participating in this specially designed seminar series for junior faculty, though all are welcomed to participate. We'll share strategies and best practices for effective and efficient teaching. There will be great conversations, handouts, and lunch! Since each session builds on each other, we hope you will be able to attend all the meetings. Session 3: Creating a Promising Syllabus to Motivate Learning Wednesday, February 20, 2019 11:30 - 1:00 Room 428, Armory Building At its most basic level, the syllabus is used to communicate information about the course, the instructor, learning objectives, assignments, grading policies, due dates, the university's academic integrity statement, and, in some cases, an increasingly long list of strongly worded admonitions on what is and isn't acceptable behavior in the college classroom. Is it just a contract? Look at your syllabus. What is the message? What is your tone? Will the course be inviting, engaging and motivating? Will it be collaborative? Fair? This is a great opportunity to think about how/if your syllabus promotes a learning-centered environment. We'll also help you create a graphic syllabus. . This workshop counts towards the Graduate Teacher Certificate, the Teacher Scholar Certificate or the Certificate in Foundations of Teaching. Please mark these dates on your calendarWed, Feb. 6, 2019 Session 1: "I wish I had known that earlier": Using Informal (IEF) and Formal (ICES) Student Feedback to Improve Teaching and LearningWed, Feb. 13, 2019 Session 2: Improving Our Testing and Grading of Student AchievementWed, Feb. 20, 2019 Session 3: Creating a Promising Syllabus to Motivate LearningFri, Feb. 22, 2019 Campus Annual Faculty Retreat: "Transformative Assignments: Mobilizing Students to be Creators" (Location: Illini Union Rooms A, B, C)
  • Advanced Interfaces for Energy, Water and Biological Systems

    12 pm
    Abstract A fundamental understanding of solid-liquid interfaces plays a critical role in energy, water and even biological systems (e.g. freezing, condensation, evaporation, crystal growth and regenerative medicine). Knowledge on physics of these interfaces allows us to control interfacial momentum and energy transfer in multiple length and time scales and to create new surfaces with unprecedented characteristics. Miniaturization and enhanced functional performance have been the main focuses of advancement in high-performance integrated circuits, power electronics, and photonic devices in the last few decades. This trend has amplified the generated thermal energy in these devices making the thermal management a bottleneck for the accelerated innovation in these disciplines. We will discuss a new paradigm to address this bottleneck through thin-film evaporation under negative pressure. The heat fluxes in order of 11 kWcm-2 are achieved through nanoscale evaporation in confined geometries. The rational routes to achieve kinetics limits of evaporative heat flux are discussed. In the second part, we introduce two new physical concepts that are used to develop advanced interfaces. Underlying physic of these surfaces is discussed and implementation of these concepts in anti-icing and anti-fouling surfaces is shown. These magnetic surfaces outperform other state-of-the-art anti-icing surfaces with ice formation temperature of -34 oC and ice adhesion strength of ~2 Pa (five orders of magnitude lower than state-of-the-art surfaces). About the Speaker Hadi Ghasemi is Bill D. Cook Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Houston and director of Nanotherm research group. He received his PhD degree in 2011 from the University of Toronto. He continued his studies as a Postdoctoral Associate at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 2012 to 2014. He is the recipient of the several awards in the field of heat transfer and thermodynamics including AFOSR Young Investigator Award, top three innovator award of NASA iTech, University Excellence Award and Russel Reynolds award in Thermodynamics. He was selected as one of the finalist for World Technology Award in the energy category in 2014. His research works are highlighted in Nature, Economists and Popular Science among others. His current research interests are in nanotechnology, heat transfer and surface physics. (www.nanothermlab.com)
  • Advanced Interfaces for Energy, Water and Biological Systems

    12 pm
    Abstract A fundamental understanding of solid-liquid interfaces plays a critical role in energy, water and even biological systems (e.g. freezing, condensation, evaporation, crystal growth and regenerative medicine). Knowledge on physics of these interfaces allows us to control interfacial momentum and energy transfer in multiple length and time scales and to create new surfaces with unprecedented characteristics. Miniaturization and enhanced functional performance have been the main focuses of advancement in high-performance integrated circuits, power electronics, and photonic devices in the last few decades. This trend has amplified the generated thermal energy in these devices making the thermal management a bottleneck for the accelerated innovation in these disciplines. We will discuss a new paradigm to address this bottleneck through thin-film evaporation under negative pressure. The heat fluxes in order of 11 kWcm-2 are achieved through nanoscale evaporation in confined geometries. The rational routes to achieve kinetics limits of evaporative heat flux are discussed. In the second part, we introduce two new physical concepts that are used to develop advanced interfaces. Underlying physic of these surfaces is discussed and implementation of these concepts in anti-icing and anti-fouling surfaces is shown. These magnetic surfaces outperform other state-of-the-art anti-icing surfaces with ice formation temperature of -34 oC and ice adhesion strength of ~2 Pa (five orders of magnitude lower than state-of-the-art surfaces). About the Speaker Hadi Ghasemi is Bill D. Cook Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Houston and director of Nanotherm research group. He received his PhD degree in 2011 from the University of Toronto. He continued his studies as a Postdoctoral Associate at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 2012 to 2014. He is the recipient of the several awards in the field of heat transfer and thermodynamics including AFOSR Young Investigator Award, top three innovator award of NASA iTech, University Excellence Award and Russel Reynolds award in Thermodynamics. He was selected as one of the finalist for World Technology Award in the energy category in 2014. His research works are highlighted in Nature, Economists and Popular Science among others. His current research interests are in nanotechnology, heat transfer and surface physics. (www.nanothermlab.com)
  • Efficient Data Management

    12 pm
    Lunch with the Core Dan Davidson Director of CNRG and Research Computing "Efficient Data Management"
  • Yoga at Beckman

    12 pm

    Check the resource site for more information.

  • Advanced Interfaces for Energy, Water and Biological Systems

    12 pm
    Abstract A fundamental understanding of solid-liquid interfaces plays a critical role in energy, water and even biological systems (e.g. freezing, condensation, evaporation, crystal growth and regenerative medicine). Knowledge on physics of these interfaces allows us to control interfacial momentum and energy transfer in multiple length and time scales and to create new surfaces with unprecedented characteristics. Miniaturization and enhanced functional performance have been the main focuses of advancement in high-performance integrated circuits, power electronics, and photonic devices in the last few decades. This trend has amplified the generated thermal energy in these devices making the thermal management a bottleneck for the accelerated innovation in these disciplines. We will discuss a new paradigm to address this bottleneck through thin-film evaporation under negative pressure. The heat fluxes in order of 11 kWcm-2 are achieved through nanoscale evaporation in confined geometries. The rational routes to achieve kinetics limits of evaporative heat flux are discussed. In the second part, we introduce two new physical concepts that are used to develop advanced interfaces. Underlying physic of these surfaces is discussed and implementation of these concepts in anti-icing and anti-fouling surfaces is shown. These magnetic surfaces outperform other state-of-the-art anti-icing surfaces with ice formation temperature of -34 oC and ice adhesion strength of ~2 Pa (five orders of magnitude lower than state-of-the-art surfaces). About the Speaker Hadi Ghasemi is Bill D. Cook Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Houston and director of Nanotherm research group. He received his PhD degree in 2011 from the University of Toronto. He continued his studies as a Postdoctoral Associate at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) from 2012 to 2014. He is the recipient of the several awards in the field of heat transfer and thermodynamics including AFOSR Young Investigator Award, top three innovator award of NASA iTech, University Excellence Award and Russel Reynolds award in Thermodynamics. He was selected as one of the finalist for World Technology Award in the energy category in 2014. His research works are highlighted in Nature, Economists and Popular Science among others. His current research interests are in nanotechnology, heat transfer and surface physics. (www.nanothermlab.com)
  • Protecting your Data on the Web

    1 pm – 2 pm
    Ever wonder how advertisements appear on Facebook for something you were recently shopping for online? This hands-on workshop goes over how to protect your data from search engines and other websites. We will also go over some basics about how web pages are indexed and organized. http://guides.library.illinois.edu/filterbubbles
  • Lightroom: Level 1

    1 pm – 4 pm
    This 6-hour course introduces the basics of Adobe Lightroom. Participants will work on the organization and management of photos, learning the Lightroom environment, managing images and workflow, reviewing images, sorting and organizing images as well as managing an image catalog.
  • SEW Talk Series

    2 pm

    Check the resource site for more information.

  • Professional Development Fair for Graduate Students

    3 pm – 5 pm
    You are invited to the 3rd Annual Professional Development Fair for Graduate Students! Learn about services and resources to help you build skills for success in graduate school and beyond. Need a professional head shot? Stop by anytime during the fair to have your picture taken and receive a free web resolution image. Participating campus units include:Center for Innovation in Teaching and Learning (CITL)Diversity & Social Justice EducationDisability Resources and Educational ServicesGraduate College Career Development OfficeGraduate College Fellowship OfficeGraduate College Thesis OfficeIllinois MakerLabInternational Student and Scholar ServicesThe Leadership CenterOffice for Protection of Research SubjectsOffice of Registered OrganizationsResearch ParkScholarly Communication & Publishing, LibrarySoftware and Data CarpentryTechnology Entrepreneurship CenterTechnology Services/WebstoreWriting CenterResearch Data Service - LibraryResearch Integrity Office (OVCR)University of Illinois Extension See the full listing of Graduate College workshops:go.grad.illinois.edu/workshops
  • BRL Seminar and Journal Club

    4 pm

    Check the resource site for more information.

  • PEEC Seminar - Extinction and the Value of Diversity

    4 pm – 5 pm
    Dr. David SepkoskiDepartment of History"Extinction and the Value of Diversity"Wednesday, February 20, 2019, 4:00 P.M.Charles G. Miller AuditoriumB102 CLSL Abstract: Why do we care about preserving biodiversity? At the beginning of the 21st century, biodiversity has come to be seen as fragile and tenuous, constantly endangered by the threat of loss. Extinction plays a central role in this understanding of biodiversity. Whereas most historians who have examined this phenomenon have placed the modern biodiversity movement in the context of a history of conservation biology and endangered species protection, I want to frame it in a new perspective. This talk will examine the influence of biological theories about the nature and dynamics of extinction--and especially mass extinction--on the current valuation of biological diversity. I will focus particularly on the ways that new understandings of extinction in the past--for example, the extinction of the dinosaurs--have converged with scientific and cultural anxieties about the present--the specters of global warming, nuclear war, and biodiversity loss. I will argue that this new model of extinction has played a prominent conceptual and rhetorical role in debates surrounding the current biodiversity crisis, which I will examine in critical historical perspective. Coffee and cookies will be served in the atrium outside the auditorium beginningat 3:30 p.m.
  • Graduate Student Therapy Group

    4 pm – 5 pm
    DRES Graduate Student Therapy Group
  • Self-Organized and programmed behaviors of microswimmers from the individual to collective scale

    4 pm
    Talk Abstract: The study of microswimmers in natural and artificial systems has offered tremendous opportunitiesfor biomedical applications, while also providing models to investigate key questions in physics and biology of living systems. However, before we can harness or even program the behaviors ofthese microswimmers to utilize their capabilities, we need to understand how individual swimmers sense, adapt and navigate their environments, how they generate complex fluid flows to interactwith each other, and how they self-organize into dynamic patterns that encode synergistic effects to their functions. In this talk, I will describe three topics of my research on microswimmerbehaviors from the individual to collective scale: (1) I discover a striking polygonal swimmingpattern in Euglena gracilis due to increased light intensity. This novel polygonal behavior emergesfrom periodic switching between the flagellar beating patterns of helical swimming and spinningbehaviors. I will explain how Euglena cells achieve effective phototactic navigation by coordinated switching between their behaviors. (2) I integrate machine learning into the design of a new classof self-learning, adaptive artificial microswimmers. These smart swimmers can identify and progressively improve swimming policies based on its interactions with the surroundings, andadapt their swimming gaits to traverse media with vastly different properties. (3) I develop modelsto capture the collective behavior of microswimmer suspensions confined in microfluidicchannels. I will explain how the interplay of hydrodynamic interactions, cell-cell interactions andgeometric confinements lead to self-organization of the microswimmers into density waves, and how these wave patterns can be controlled by tuning the intensity of the external flow. Bio: Alan Tsang is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Bioengineering at Stanford University.Prior to his postdoc, he completed his PhD in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Southern California. His research interest lies in fluid mechanics and biophysics of living systemsat the microscales. In particular, he investigates microswimmer behaviors from the individual to collective scale both theoretically and experimentally, including cell locomotion, taxis strategies,cell-cell hydrodynamic interactions, and multicellular pattern formation.
  • CITL Statistics, Data, and Survey Research Workshop Series - SAS I: Getting Started with SAS

    5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
    The SAS program is a syntax-driven statistical and data management program used in many different professional and academic disciplines. It has a reputation for being difficult to learn at first, so let us help you get ahead of the curve with this introductory course. Topics covered include:Introduction to SAS windowsCreating and defining librariesBasic SAS syntaxComputing new variablesRecoding variablesCreating frequency and contingency tablesObtaining univariate statisticsHandling SAS output

Thu Feb. 21, 2019

  • Deadline to Schedule Final Exams in the TAC-April 4

    12 am
    Testing Accommodations Center (TAC)Please use the TAC website, http://www.disability.illinois.edu/academic-support/accommodations/testing-accommodations, to schedule all exams/quizzes and review polices! Please remember to schedule your exams at least one week in advance online and no later than 8:00am one business day before you schedule to take the exam. The Deadline to schedule Final Exams for the Spring 2019 Semester is April 4, 2019 by 4:00pm.
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • DRES Academic Lab

    8 am – 5 pm
    Walk-in hours available Monday through Friday from 8 am -5pm. Drop in for academic, organization, and planning assistance!
  • Encouraging Student Motivation through Authentic Activities

    10 am – 11 am
    Do you ever feel a disconnect between how much you and your students care about the material or assignments in a course? To increase students' motivation, it is key to recognize how assignments and activities can relate to real situations that matter to your students. Come learn how theories of motivation can help you design authentic activities that give students the opportunity to become self-motivated learners in your classroom. This is a TA-to-TA workshop, offered by one of CITL's Graduate Affiliates. This workshop counts towards the Graduate Teacher Certificate or the Certificate in Foundations of Teaching.
  • Molecular & Integrative Physiology Seminar: Carolyn Cummins, Ph.D., Univ. Toronto, "ARGLU1 is a new GR coregulator that impacts glucocorticoid function in the liver, adipose and brain"

    11 am

    Check the resource site for more information.

  • Google for Research

    11 am – 12 pm
    Curious about how you can use Google for more than just restaurant reviews? Learn how to navigate Google's search functions in this hands-on workshop. We'll go over Google, Google Scholar, and Google Images to discover how they can be used in your research. http://guides.library.illinois.edu/google
  • Hands-On Teaching and Learning with Adobe Spark, Audition, and Premiere Rush

    1:30 pm – 3 pm
    Bring your laptop and set-up your Adobe Spark login (no cost, nothing to download) to join in a friendly hands-on competition to create a well designed, pedagogically innovative, multimodal assignment prompt. Prizes for best prompt in each discipline, best overall design, and best first-time web designer. This workshop will enable us to practice what we are preaching about transformative pedagogies and leave with a tangible, sharable assignment prompt. Follow these simplesteps to set up your free, online Adobe Spark account the day before the faculty retreat. Simple steps for setting up an Adobe Spark Account the day before the retreat. no later than Thu Feb 21,go to http://spark.adobe.comselect "login in" in the top-right cornerclick "Log in with school account"follow the U of IL enterprise log-in stepswhen you see "Welcome to Spark" you are in and ready to create!contact Robert Baird (r-baird@illinois.edu) at CITL if you need help.
  • Data Documentation

    2 pm – 3 pm
    Hands on workshop provides participants with experience writing and using various types of documentation. Goals: Understand elements of good documentation, evaluate an example, and apply knowledge.
  • CCIL Faculty Seminar Series

    3 pm

    Check the resource site for more information.

  • Effective Presentation Visuals

    3:30 pm – 5 pm
    We've all seen PowerPoint presentations with too much text, unappealing visuals, or a combination of both. This workshop discusses strategies for creating visual materials that help enhance (and not detract from) your research. Whether you are teaching a class, preparing for a conference talk or poster presentation, or participating inResearch Live!, this workshop will give you the tools you need to create impactful and memorable presentations. Can't make it in person? This workshop will be simultaneously broadcast online:go.grad.illinois.edu/eventspace See the full listing of Graduate College workshops:go.grad.illinois.edu/workshops
  • Writing Effective Personal Statements

    4 pm – 5 pm
    Learn how to write an effective personal statement, also called an "application essay" or "statement of purpose". This presentation will review successful strategies and help you develop a plan for your own personal statement.
  • Emma Dench | "Race, Ethnicity and Beyond in Classical Antiquity"

    7:30 pm
    Disturbing racist incidents amongst and against scholars and students of classical antiquity have turned the spotlight on the nature of the field's engagement with questions of race and ethnicity in ancient societies. Taking 1990 as a pivotal point, I trace the trajectory of modern discussions of race and ethnicity in classical antiquity, highlight some of our missed opportunities, and suggest some possible new directions. Co-Sponsored by the Department of Classics and part of a workshop on "Race Work in the Classics" on February 22, 2019. Emma Dench is the McLean Professor of Ancient and Modern History and of the Classics at Harvard. She was born in York, England, and grew up near Stratford-Upon-Avon. After a mercifully brief stint as a child actor (e.g. as Peaseblossom in Peter Hall's movie of A Midsummer Night's Dream, 1968), she turned to Classics. She took her BA in Literae Humaniores and her DPhil in Ancient History from Oxford University. Before moving to Harvard in 2007, she taught classics and ancient history to mature students (over 21 and in full-time employment or equivalent) for fourteen years at Birkbeck College, University of London. She has been a Craven Fellow at the University of Oxford, a Rome Scholar, and a Hugh Last Fellow at the British School of Rome, a Cotton Fellow, a Member of the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, a Visiting Professor of the Classics and of History at Harvard, and a Loeb Classical Library Foundation Fellow. She delivered the Gray Lectures at the University of Cambridge in 2016. Emma Dench is the author of From Barbarians to New Men: Greek, Roman, and Modern Perceptions of Peoples from the Central Apennines (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1995) and Romulus' Asylum: Roman Identities from the Age of Alexander to the Age of Hadrian (Oxford University Press, 2005). Empire and Political Cultures in the Roman World appeared as a Key Theme in Ancient History (Cambridge University Press) in August 2018. She has published widely on ancient conceptualizations of race, ethnicity and empire, and on ancient historiography. Her current projects include a study of race in Classics and in the ancient world, and ancient Roman Republicanism.
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